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1st Reading - Attitude & Manners at a Job Interview
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2nd Reading - Attitude & Manners at a Job Interview
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3rd Reading - Attitude & Manners at a Job Interview
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Attitude & Manners at a Job Interview

Having a good attitude and good manners are important both at an interview and on the job. Managers agree that a person’s attitude can be more important than work experience. Your attitude makes a big difference. 

If you are excited about being at the interview and are eager to be hired for the job, the employer will probably consider you for the job. If you speak softly and look at your feet during the interview, the employer may not consider you for the job. Managers are looking for someone who is alert, motivated, and enthusiastic.

Using good manners at an interview and at your workplace is very important. The way you act tells a great deal to an employer. If you’re polite and kind, the employer can see that you get along with people and you have a respect for seniority, company managers, and supervisors. 

One of the first manners an employer will look for is punctuality, or being on time for the interview. This indicates whether you’re reliable and will be to work on time. Being late for an interview could hurt your chances of being hired.

When you meet the manager, smile. Then offer a friendly greeting of “Hello” or “Hi.” Give the manager a firm handshake. Address the manager as Mr. or Ms. unless he or she asks you to call him or her by a first name. This shows that you have respect for the manager’s position. Also, look at the manager directly in the eyes, not down at your feet. 

During the interview, sit up straight in the chair. This shows that you’re alert and interested. Keep your hands and feet still during the interview, and never chew gum.

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Project made financially possible through grants from:

Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners

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