1st Reading - Bee Stings
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2nd Reading - Bee Stings
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3rd Reading - Bee Stings
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Bee Stings

When it’s sunny and warm, people love to spend time outside. Sadly, spending time outdoors can mean the risk of a bee sting. Most stings are caused by yellow jackets, but bees, wasps, and hornets can all sting. 

To avoid bee stings, shoes should always be worn outside. It is best to wear dull or light-colored clothing. Bees like bright colors. Children should not play near flowers.

If you or your child gets stung, there are some things you should do:

  1. Look for the stinger. If you see the black dot, scrape it off but do not try to squeeze it out of the skin. 

  2. Rub the sting with a cotton ball that has baking soda and water on it for twenty minutes.

  3. If the sting still hurts, put ice on it for ten minutes.

  4. A pain reliever can be taken right away. 

Usually the pain from a sting stops in a couple hours. The location of the sting may be swollen for twenty-four hours. Call a doctor if the swelling lasts more than one day or if the sting is very painful. If someone is stung many times, he may have diarrhea or vomit. He may also have a headache or a fever. 

If a sting causes an allergic reaction, it will be hard to breathe or swallow. This person may also pass out or get hives. If this happens, call 911 right away. For some people, bee stings can be fatal. Get help quickly if you think it is needed.

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© 2015 by Southwest Adult Basic Education

Project made financially possible through grants from:

Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners

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