1st Reading - ​School-Age Children and Bed-Wetting
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2nd Reading - ​School-Age Children and Bed-Wetting
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3rd Reading - ​School-Age Children and Bed-Wetting
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School-Age Children and Bed-Wetting

 If your school-age child wets the bed at night, he’s not alone. Fifteen percent of five-year-olds wet the bed. Night bed-wetting is very common in preschool-age children. Most doctors won’t treat bed-wetting with medication until children are at least seven years old. Also, medications are best used for short-term help. 

There are some common reasons your child may wet the bed:

 

  • Your child’s bladder has not developed enough to hold urine through the night.

  • Your child has not learned how to recognize when her bladder is full during sleep.

  • Your child may be a deep sleeper.

  • Your child may have a medical or emotional issue. 

 

If your child suffers from bed-wetting, try these helpful hints:

  • Ask your child to try to use the bathroom about every two hours during the day. This habit helps to train the bladder.

  • Do not let your child drink too much in the evening. It’s okay for children to drink fluids (especially water!) during the day.

  • Do not give your child caffeine. Caffeine can cause children to need to urinate more often.

  • Ask your child to go to the bathroom 15 minutes before bed and then right before bed.

  • Praise your child when he has a dry night. Do not punish the child if he doesn’t.

 

Bed-wetting will likely stop on its own. If you are concerned, ask your doctor for help. Your doctor may suggest your child uses an alarm or may prescribe medication. However, medications do not cure bed-wetting.

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Project made financially possible through grants from:

Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners

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