1st Reading - Why Stop Smoking?
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2nd Reading - Why Stop Smoking?
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3rd Reading - Why Stop Smoking?
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Why Stop Smoking?

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Pam is a 42-year-old mother of two teenage children. She has smoked almost two packs of cigarettes a day for over 25 years. Her kids have asked her to quit many times. Two years ago, she started smoking outside. She knew secondhand smoke was not good for her children. She also knew smoking was not good for her own health, but she was not ready to quit. 

Two months ago, Pam’s daughter came home from school with a brochure from the American Cancer Society. This information changed Pam’s outlook on smoking. Pam discovered that she was not doomed to a life of smoking-related illnesses. Her body could recover. The sooner she stopped smoking, the sooner her body could rid itself of the harmful effects of tobacco.

The following information convinced Pam to stop smoking. The changes that take place in the body when a person stops smoking are

  • Within 20 minutes your blood pressure drops to normal. Your pulse rate also drops to a normal rate. The body temperature of your hands and feet increases to normal.

  • Within 8 hours the oxygen level in your blood increases to normal.

  • Within 24 hours your chance of a heart attack decreases. 

  • Within 48 hours your nerve endings start regrowing. Your ability to smell and taste is enhanced.

  • Within 72 hours your breathing is easier. Your lungs are functioning better. 

  • Within 1 to 9 months coughing and shortness of breath decrease. Your lungs are healthier and cleaner.

  • Within 10 years your chances of dying from lung cancer drops to 12 in 100,000—almost the rate of nonsmokers. Your risk of all other cancers also decreases.

Pam has experienced other benefits from quitting smoking. She now has fresher breath and her teeth look whiter. She feels more in control of her life. She does not have to worry where or when she’ll be able to have a cigarette.

© 2015 by Southwest Adult Basic Education

Project made financially possible through grants from:

Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners

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