1st Reading - Winter Storm Survival on the Road
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2nd Reading - Winter Storm Survival on the Road
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3rd Reading - Winter Storm Survival on the Road
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Winter Storm Survival on the Road

Joe found himself driving in a snowstorm. The roads were slippery. Visibility was poor. Soon he was stuck in the ditch. He did the right thing by staying with his car. People who leave their car can get lost. They can become exhausted and overcome by the cold. Walking in a storm is very dangerous.

While he was waiting for help, he shoveled the snow away from the tail pipe of his car. A blocked tail pipe causes deadly fumes of carbon monoxide to back up inside of a car. Joe was now ready to start the engine and warm the car.

Joe was glad he had just filled his gas tank. It could take a long time for help to arrive. He tries to keep his tank at least half full in the winter. This also helps to keep the car’s gas line from freezing. 

Joe was also glad he had prepared a winter storm survival kit for his car. He had a warm blanket. (A sleeping bag is another option.) He also had these items in a box he kept in his trunk:

                     

first aid kit         booster cables   flashlight with extra batteries

knife         paper towels              tool kit   

ice scraper           small snow shovel   snowbrush

Candy bars or other high calorie foods that won’t spoil 

 

Small can and waterproof matches to melt snow for drinking water

Ten-pound bag of sand or kitty litter to put under tires for better traction on snow or ice

 

After three hours of waiting, help did arrive. Joe was very thankful! He was also very pleased with himself. He had made good decisions and was well prepared. He was warm and safe.

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Southwest Initiative Foundation, Marshall Community Foundation, Southwest Regional Transition Partners, Southwest Adult Basic Education, Marshall Healthcare Partners

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